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Medieval & Early Modern Jewish Societies
71,90 € *
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This book contains seven chapters based on articles appearing in the scholarly journal JUDAICA between 2014 and 2018. The work within is dedicated to several subjects in the Jewish history of the Middle ages and Early Modern period in Central Europe and the Near East, discussing relations between them. Included in this book is research material based on Hebrew sources hitherto unstudied and therefore offers brand new avenues of thought and insight. The author has traveled across parts of Europe documenting the lives of individuals and communities spanning several centuries, who brought important and significant changes to Jewish society through intercontinental trade and intellectual campaigns. Read about the traumatic events during the reign of Ferdinand I, king of Bohemia and Hungary (1526-1558) and later Holy Roman Emperor (1558-1564), the civil war in the beginning of 1611 in Prague and the successful diplomatic missions and establishment of the city of the Tiberias, in the Land of Israel in the sixties of the 16th century, by two members of the Nasi family on behalf of the Sultan of Istanbul. On the front cover: The Old Synagogue in Erfurt after restoration, built circa 1100.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.06.2020
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Veit Bach
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Vitus "Veit" Bach (born ca. 1550, Wechmar, or Pressburg - before 1578, or March 8, 1619, in Hungary, or Wechmar) was a Hungarian miller who, according to Johann Sebastian Bach, founded the Bach family, which became the most important family in Western musical history. Veit's son, Johannes Bach (ca. 1550-1626) was the grandfather of Johann Ambrosius Bach, J.S. Bach's father, which makes him J.S's great-great-grandfather. Evading religious persecution in the Kingdom of Hungary, then under the control of the staunchly Roman Catholic Habsburgs, Bach, being a Protestant, settled in Wechmar, a village in the German state of Thuringia. His descendants continued to live there until Christoph Bach, grandfather of J.S. Bach, moved to Erfurt to take up a position as municipal musician or Stadtpfeifer (lit. "town piper").

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 02.06.2020
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A Five Year Plan for Geraniums
66,90 CHF *
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The dubious experiment in political economy and social engineering known as socialism, which distorted the functioning of Russia and the Eastern European countries and did horrifying damage to their populations for much of the twentieth century, left its mark on many industries. One industry, which has not received as much attention as other larger ones, is horticulture, with its subsector of floriculture. In 1945, at the end of World War II, Germany was finally divided into two sectors-east and west. By a curious fluke of history, the largest part of German flower production had long been situated in three eastern states, including Erfurt in Thuringia. East Germany inherited this wonderful industry, run by prosperous companies with enlightened owners and a background of constantly developing new and more beautiful plants. In my two previous books about the work of heroic flower breeders, it turned out that a number of them had ended up behind the Iron Curtain. Their new communist masters abhorred successful private industry and started to dismantle these firms as soon as they could in the name of building a 'socialist eden.' The result was tragedy. The leaders of the industry were often arrested, even killed, lost both businesses and the property on which they stood and, if they were lucky enough to escape to West Germany, gave up all their rights. The government collectivized the firms, setting up lumbering organizations to replace them. Prices were set, regardless of basic economic factors. There were no incentives to do a good job. The Benary family had been leaders in breeding begonias. Wilhelm Elsner was the third generation in his family to head a company that specialized in pelargoniums ('geraniums' to the rest of us). He was locked out of his nursery in Dresden and not permitted to enter it again until after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989. See what happened to so many others.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
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A Five Year Plan for Geraniums
45,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The dubious experiment in political economy and social engineering known as socialism, which distorted the functioning of Russia and the Eastern European countries and did horrifying damage to their populations for much of the twentieth century, left its mark on many industries. One industry, which has not received as much attention as other larger ones, is horticulture, with its subsector of floriculture. In 1945, at the end of World War II, Germany was finally divided into two sectors-east and west. By a curious fluke of history, the largest part of German flower production had long been situated in three eastern states, including Erfurt in Thuringia. East Germany inherited this wonderful industry, run by prosperous companies with enlightened owners and a background of constantly developing new and more beautiful plants. In my two previous books about the work of heroic flower breeders, it turned out that a number of them had ended up behind the Iron Curtain. Their new communist masters abhorred successful private industry and started to dismantle these firms as soon as they could in the name of building a 'socialist eden.' The result was tragedy. The leaders of the industry were often arrested, even killed, lost both businesses and the property on which they stood and, if they were lucky enough to escape to West Germany, gave up all their rights. The government collectivized the firms, setting up lumbering organizations to replace them. Prices were set, regardless of basic economic factors. There were no incentives to do a good job. The Benary family had been leaders in breeding begonias. Wilhelm Elsner was the third generation in his family to head a company that specialized in pelargoniums ('geraniums' to the rest of us). He was locked out of his nursery in Dresden and not permitted to enter it again until after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989. See what happened to so many others.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
A Five Year Plan for Geraniums
36,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The dubious experiment in political economy and social engineering known as socialism, which distorted the functioning of Russia and the Eastern European countries and did horrifying damage to their populations for much of the twentieth century, left its mark on many industries. One industry, which has not received as much attention as other larger ones, is horticulture, with its subsector of floriculture. In 1945, at the end of World War II, Germany was finally divided into two sectors-east and west. By a curious fluke of history, the largest part of German flower production had long been situated in three eastern states, including Erfurt in Thuringia. East Germany inherited this wonderful industry, run by prosperous companies with enlightened owners and a background of constantly developing new and more beautiful plants. In my two previous books about the work of heroic flower breeders, it turned out that a number of them had ended up behind the Iron Curtain. Their new communist masters abhorred successful private industry and started to dismantle these firms as soon as they could in the name of building a 'socialist eden.' The result was tragedy. The leaders of the industry were often arrested, even killed, lost both businesses and the property on which they stood and, if they were lucky enough to escape to West Germany, gave up all their rights. The government collectivized the firms, setting up lumbering organizations to replace them. Prices were set, regardless of basic economic factors. There were no incentives to do a good job. The Benary family had been leaders in breeding begonias. Wilhelm Elsner was the third generation in his family to head a company that specialized in pelargoniums ('geraniums' to the rest of us). He was locked out of his nursery in Dresden and not permitted to enter it again until after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989. See what happened to so many others.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
A Five Year Plan for Geraniums
24,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

The dubious experiment in political economy and social engineering known as socialism, which distorted the functioning of Russia and the Eastern European countries and did horrifying damage to their populations for much of the twentieth century, left its mark on many industries. One industry, which has not received as much attention as other larger ones, is horticulture, with its subsector of floriculture. In 1945, at the end of World War II, Germany was finally divided into two sectors-east and west. By a curious fluke of history, the largest part of German flower production had long been situated in three eastern states, including Erfurt in Thuringia. East Germany inherited this wonderful industry, run by prosperous companies with enlightened owners and a background of constantly developing new and more beautiful plants. In my two previous books about the work of heroic flower breeders, it turned out that a number of them had ended up behind the Iron Curtain. Their new communist masters abhorred successful private industry and started to dismantle these firms as soon as they could in the name of building a 'socialist eden.' The result was tragedy. The leaders of the industry were often arrested, even killed, lost both businesses and the property on which they stood and, if they were lucky enough to escape to West Germany, gave up all their rights. The government collectivized the firms, setting up lumbering organizations to replace them. Prices were set, regardless of basic economic factors. There were no incentives to do a good job. The Benary family had been leaders in breeding begonias. Wilhelm Elsner was the third generation in his family to head a company that specialized in pelargoniums ('geraniums' to the rest of us). He was locked out of his nursery in Dresden and not permitted to enter it again until after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989. See what happened to so many others.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.06.2020
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Complete Organ Music
11,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

A previous Brilliant Classics release from the organist Sergio Militello (BC94483) offered an attractive taster course to the music of the most distinguished family in music history. Now, having recorded the complete organ works of both the family's supreme craftsman and genius (BC95105), and a North-German predecessor Johann Kuhnau (BC95089), Stefano Molardi turns his attention to two earlier members of the Bach family who have inevitably been obscured by the shadow cast by Johann Sebastian. In fact as uncle to JS, Johann Christoph Bach exercised a significant influence over his musical education, as composer, organist and indeed organ-designer. Sacred vocal works such as the Requiem have been revived in recent times, but the scant surviving proportion of his keyboard music has received too little critical attention. They comprise a prelude and fugue, and three cycles of variations on chorales. The 'free' pieces reveal an inventive spirit, fantasy, a certain skill in handling counterpoint and the use of expressive devices which show him no less open than his nephew to the exuberant vitality of the Italian tradition represented by Frescobaldi and Monteverdi. Brother of Johann Christoph, Johann Michael was also father to the Maria Barbara who became Johann Sebastian's first wife. He too worked in the town of Arnstadt where the 18-year-old Johann Sebastian took up his first post in what is now appropriately known as the 'Bach Church'. Doubtless J.M. Bach's production was no less industrious than his brother, if scarcely matching his nephew, but the only extant organ works are chorale settings - 24 of them - which elaborate flowing counterpoint over and around the familiar hymn melodies such as In dulci jubilo and Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ. On this release, Stefano Molardi plays a finely preserved instrument from 1732-37 by Franciscus Volckland in the Cruciskirche of Erfurt, just a quarter-hour's car drive from Arnstadt. In considering the fourth volume of Molardi's Bach survey (BC95005), Early Music Review took note of the Erfurt organ's striking variety of tone colour, and praised his playing for its 'considerable clarity' and lack of histrionics, 'without extremes of registration or tempi - just what you need for the purposes of study or reference.' A FIRST RECORDING: the complete organ works by Johann Michael and Johann Christoph Bach! Johann Michael (1648-1694) and Johann Christoph (1642-1703) were brothers, and nephew of the great Johann Sebastian. The daughter of Johann Michael was Maria Barbara, the first wife of Johann Sebastian, and therefore mother of both Carl Philipp Emanuel and Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. The Bach dynasty held a long tradition of composers and performers. Both brothers were firmly rooted in the Central German organ school, with a strong emphasis on counterpoint, while also under the Italian influence of vocal melodies and fluent lines. The greatest part of both brother's oeuvre consists of Choralvorspiele, while Johann Christoph wrote some substantial variation cycles. Played on the historic 1732 Volckland organ of the Cruciskirche in Erfurt, Germany, by Stefano Molardi, one of the foremost organists of Italy, whose Kuhnau recording for Brilliant Classics was longlisted for the Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Complete Organ Music
22,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

A previous Brilliant Classics release from the organist Sergio Militello (BC94483) offered an attractive taster course to the music of the most distinguished family in music history. Now, having recorded the complete organ works of both the family's supreme craftsman and genius (BC95105), and a North-German predecessor Johann Kuhnau (BC95089), Stefano Molardi turns his attention to two earlier members of the Bach family who have inevitably been obscured by the shadow cast by Johann Sebastian. In fact as uncle to JS, Johann Christoph Bach exercised a significant influence over his musical education, as composer, organist and indeed organ-designer. Sacred vocal works such as the Requiem have been revived in recent times, but the scant surviving proportion of his keyboard music has received too little critical attention. They comprise a prelude and fugue, and three cycles of variations on chorales. The 'free' pieces reveal an inventive spirit, fantasy, a certain skill in handling counterpoint and the use of expressive devices which show him no less open than his nephew to the exuberant vitality of the Italian tradition represented by Frescobaldi and Monteverdi. Brother of Johann Christoph, Johann Michael was also father to the Maria Barbara who became Johann Sebastian's first wife. He too worked in the town of Arnstadt where the 18-year-old Johann Sebastian took up his first post in what is now appropriately known as the 'Bach Church'. Doubtless J.M. Bach's production was no less industrious than his brother, if scarcely matching his nephew, but the only extant organ works are chorale settings - 24 of them - which elaborate flowing counterpoint over and around the familiar hymn melodies such as In dulci jubilo and Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ. On this release, Stefano Molardi plays a finely preserved instrument from 1732-37 by Franciscus Volckland in the Cruciskirche of Erfurt, just a quarter-hour's car drive from Arnstadt. In considering the fourth volume of Molardi's Bach survey (BC95005), Early Music Review took note of the Erfurt organ's striking variety of tone colour, and praised his playing for its 'considerable clarity' and lack of histrionics, 'without extremes of registration or tempi - just what you need for the purposes of study or reference.' A FIRST RECORDING: the complete organ works by Johann Michael and Johann Christoph Bach! Johann Michael (1648-1694) and Johann Christoph (1642-1703) were brothers, and nephew of the great Johann Sebastian. The daughter of Johann Michael was Maria Barbara, the first wife of Johann Sebastian, and therefore mother of both Carl Philipp Emanuel and Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. The Bach dynasty held a long tradition of composers and performers. Both brothers were firmly rooted in the Central German organ school, with a strong emphasis on counterpoint, while also under the Italian influence of vocal melodies and fluent lines. The greatest part of both brother's oeuvre consists of Choralvorspiele, while Johann Christoph wrote some substantial variation cycles. Played on the historic 1732 Volckland organ of the Cruciskirche in Erfurt, Germany, by Stefano Molardi, one of the foremost organists of Italy, whose Kuhnau recording for Brilliant Classics was longlisted for the Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot